Jun 182007
 

This restaurant is closed!

The Crab Cakes are a house specialty at 18 North.

The Crab Cakes are a house specialty at 18 North.

18 North is housed in a rehabbed Catholic Church in the charming town of St. Charles. The owner’s husband was sure to clarify when we made reservations that the restaurant is located on Fourth Street not Fourth Avenue. That’s because there’s a traditional Catholic Church on Fourth Avenue, and occasionally hungry restaurant goers have wandered into Mass looking for a gourmet meal. We managed to find our way to the dinner table, but did we find ambrosia?

Download Chicago Bites (6.2 M)

Show Notes:
00:00 – 02:11 Eatin’ and drinkin’ in a church
02:12 – 05:09 Muscles and meat bliss
05:10 – 06:53 Canned pears and seafood abuse
06:54 – 08:28 Honesty with wait staff? That is the question
08:29 – 11:44 Fried spinach, potential greatness, and food snobbery
11:45 – 12:29 Bananas Foster temptation and cupcake surprises
12:30 – 13:27 Wrap-up and sign-off

18 North
18 N. 4th Street
St. Charles, IL

Bridget rates 18 North 5/10
Tammy rates 18 North 3/10

Tammy's overcooked tuna.

Tammy's overcooked tuna.

  One Response to “18 North
Chicago Bites Podcast #60”

  1. Hey Guys,
    More important than anything: Happy Birthday Bridget! It sounds
    like your weekend was nice in spite of your somewhat average dining
    experience…
    For what it’s worth, St Charles is one of those suburban “touristy
    towns,” like Geneva or Long Grove. The emphasis is definitely on the
    quaintness rather than the culinary experience. We’ve found the food in many of these towns to
    be very average, with only one exception.
    There used to be a restaurant in Geneva (right next to St Charles)
    called 302 West. It was housed in a former bank building and the
    chef, a guy named Joel Findlay, created the most amazing dishes I’ve
    ever tasted. I don’t eat fish as a rule, but this guy was a
    genius– everything he prepared was done to absolute perfection.
    Sadly, Joel passed away a couple years ago and the restaurant closed
    (in fact, the building is for sale, if you’re feeling
    adventurous). When he went, it was truly the end of some great
    dining.
    All that said, there are places we’ve found in the suburbs that rival
    spots in the city. We’re neither suburban-snobs nor are we city-
    phobic, so that statement isn’t a throw-down. You simply can’t go to
    tourist places expecting a culinary wonderland: the best places
    we’ve found in the suburbs are usually tucked away where few people
    know about them. The word-of-mouth network for suburban restaurants
    is very strong– you just need to know whom to speak with.
    And by the way, Lisa’s been a vegetarian for a few months now, and
    she never has a problem finding items on the menus at the places we
    go in the suburbs. 🙂
    All the best!
    Joe

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